Our long-term care news is continually updated from dozens of sources around our industry and the web.

Senior found with prostitute under bed at assisted living home, loses subsidy

A man living in a Montgomery County assisted-living facility has lost his housing subsidy after officials say he paid prostitutes using profits earned from peddling alcohol to fellow residents.

Poll: America not ready for aging population

Participants in a recent Harris poll were divided when asked whether American society will be able to afford having more people live to 80, 90 or even 100 years. Thirty-four percent said it will, whereas 38 percent said it will not and 27 percent said they’re not sure.

Bites and stings can be serious

Although insects are around all year, their presence is more apparent in the hot, sticky summer months. People, including seniors in long-term care facilities, enjoy picnics, attend outdoor musicales or simply just relax in the sunshine.

Hurricane Sandy: A lesson in survival

Oct. 22, 2012, a major storm formed in the western Caribbean and traveled up the East Coast. “Hurricane Sandy” rapidly became the largest Atlantic hurricane on record. As the storm left North America, a state of emergency was declared in seven states.

Nurses, assistants most injury prone in healthcare: CDC

Healthcare jobs have long been among the riskiest, most dangerous and injury-prone occupations around. Nurses and nurse assistants are the unluckiest among them, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Accountability for antipsychotic medication use

The use of antipsychotic medications in long-term care has been an ongoing target for scrutiny because of concerns with appropriateness and safety in older adults with dementia. Recently, the U.S. Government Accountability Office released a report showing that antipsychotic medications are frequently prescribed to older adults with dementia.

GAO issues report on advance directives

People who are older, white, female or have higher levels of education or income are more likely to have advance directives, such as living wills or healthcare powers of attorney, in place, according to a review of studies conducted by the Government Accountability Office (GAO).

CMS to expand Pioneer ACO program

A government-sanctioned study published Monday in the Journal of the American Medical Association declared Pioneer ACOs saved more than $385 million in a two-year period, prompting the administration to announce the same day it will expand the program.